Reblooming Flowering Shrubs: Part I

With the advent of Endless Summer Hydrangea there has been a lot of interest in reblooming shrubs. And why not? Garden space is valuable and you should get the most out of your shrubs. Here are few of my favorite rebloomers.
Indigofera pseudotinctoria 'Rose Carpet'



I don't want to overload you with too many images so I will show you some more rebloomers in my next post. You can learn more about each plant by clicking on the plant name. What have I missed? What are good rebloomers for you?








5 comments:

  1. Hi Tim~~ I was thrilled to see your rebloomer choices. I am an Indigofera fanatic. I have I. pseudotinctoria, I. heterantha and I. pendula. I know there are a few more species out there waiting for my wallet. I also have Leptodermis. I mistakenly planted it in the ground last year but because it stays relatively small I'm got to put it back into a container so I can keep it at nose height. I love the soft scent. I have 'Buttons and Bows' Hydrangea which surprisingly bloomed throughout last summer. Of course there's Lavatera, abutilon, many species and hybrids of fuchsia and of course roses. Then there are the sub-shrubs like lavender and cistus...I'll stop now. I want to read what YOU have to say. However, I will add that I think more people should grow Indigofera. They are a fabulous bunch of plants.

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  2. Kerria japonica is an excellent rebloomer. I also have a few of these you mentioned. Need to check out the ones I don't have. Thanks.

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  3. great photos. thanks for sharing them.

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  4. I'm really excited about the little Limelight hydrangea I ordered last year. It doesn't really rebloom, I guess, but the flowers hang around for months - especially after I dry them and place them about the house!

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  5. Yes, Kerria is a very good reblooming shrub. Love it, especially its green winter stems.

    Limelight Hydrangea is a rebloomer. If you watch the plant you will see that it keeps making new flowers right up until frost. This results in plants with green, white and pink and burgundy colored flowers on the plant all at the same time, each flower being at a different stage of aging.

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